Communities of color devastated by COVID-19: Shifting the narrative

October 25, 2020 Adiantku 0

Editor’s note: First in a series on the impact of COVID-19 on communities of color and responses aimed at improving health equity. Click here to read part 2.

By now we’ve read headlines like these all too often: “Communities of Color Devastated by COVID-19.” Way back in March, available data started to show that vulnerable, minority communities were experiencing much higher rates of infection and hospitalization from COVID-19 than their white counterparts. New York City, New Orleans, Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and Boston, where I live and work, all became ground zeros in our nation’s early battle with the pandemic. The numbers were astounding: Blacks and Latinos were four to nine times more likely to be infected by COVID than whites, even in our nation’s top hot spots. Was I surprised? Absolutely not.

A long view on health disparities

I’m originally from Puerto Rico, and grew up in a bilingual, bicultural … Read the rest

Aspirin and breast cancer risk: How a wonder drug may become more wonderful

October 24, 2020 Adiantku 0

Aspirin has been called a wonder drug. And it’s easy to see why.

It’s inexpensive, its side effects are well-known and generally minor. And since it was developed in the 1890s, it’s been shown to provide a number of potential benefits, such as relieving pain, bringing down a fever, and preventing heart attacks and strokes. Over the last 20 years or so, the list of aspirin’s potential benefits has been growing. And it might be about to get even longer: did you know that aspirin may lower your risk of several types of cancer?

Studies of aspirin and cancer

A number of studies suggest that aspirin can lower the risk of certain types of cancer, including those involving the

The evidence that aspirin can reduce the risk of colon cancer is so strong that guidelines recommend daily aspirin use for certain groups of people to … Read the rest

Promoting equity and community health in the COVID-19 pandemic

October 23, 2020 Adiantku 0

Editor’s note: Second in a series on the impact of COVID-19 on communities of color, and responses aimed at improving health equity. Click here to read part one.

In early March 2020, as COVID-19 was declared a public health emergency in Boston, Mass General Brigham began to care for a growing number of patients with COVID-19. Even at this early stage in the pandemic, a few things were clear: our data showed that Black, Hispanic, and non-English speaking patients were testing positive and being hospitalized at the highest rates. There were large differences in COVID-19 infection rates among communities. Across the river from Boston, the city of Chelsea began reporting the highest infection rate in Massachusetts. Within Boston, several neighborhoods, including Hyde Park, Roxbury, and Dorchester, exhibited infection rates double or triple the rest of the city. COVID-19 was disproportionately harming minority and vulnerable communities.

Working toward an equitable

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Securing Internet-Connected Devices in the New Era of Healthcare

October 22, 2020 Adiantku 0

The proliferation of medical and internet-connected devices in healthcare brings both clinical benefits and security risks. Just think of the volume of healthcare data being transferred and stored every day — data from IoT and connected medical devices, electronic health records (EHRs), clinical workstations, and smart hospital applications for patients, clinicians, researchers, and administrators.

All of this data requires secure and segmented networks to better protect medical devices, guest wireless devices, clinician devices and more from cybersecurity threats.

As part of National Cybersecurity Awareness Month, we’re focusing on what’s at stake when it comes to securing internet-connected devices in healthcare and how you can create an end-to-end security strategy to help address patient privacy requirements, improve threat detection, reduce management complexity and ultimately lower the risks associated with medical and IoT devices.

Why do my internet-connected devices need to be secure?

With the number of connected devices on healthcare networks … Read the rest

Podcast: How to Mentally Prepare for Anything

October 22, 2020 Adiantku 0

What’s the worst that could happen? And who will you still be regardless of the outcome? In today’s podcast, Gabe talks with author Shira Gura about her newest method CLEAR, a tool we can all use to prepare for an upcoming event or situation that is causing anxiety. 

Worried about an upcoming exam, a date, or a party where you won’t know anyone? Join us to learn a great method to help CLEAR your head before you go.

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Guest information for ‘Shira Gura- Mentally Prepare’ Podcast Episode

Shira Gura is an emotional well-being coach. Her background as an occupational therapist, yoga instructor, and mindfulness teacher led her to create two powerful self-help tools:  The unSTUCK Method® and The CLEAR Way®. She is the author two books: Getting unSTUCK: Five Simple Steps to Emotional Well-Being (which was awarded winner of the 2017 International Book Award in self-help),

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Illness-related fatigue: More than just feeling tired

October 22, 2020 Adiantku 0

A common refrain during the COVID-19 pandemic is, “I’m so tired.” After months of adjusted living and anxiety, people are understandably weary. Parents who haven’t had a break from their kids are worn out. Those trying to juggle working from home with homeschooling are stretched thin. Between concerns about health, finances, and isolation, everyone is feeling some level of additional stress during this unusual time, and that’s tiring. We all could use a good, long nap — or better yet, a vacation.

But while a break would be nice, most people — except those who are actually sick with COVID-19 or other illnesses — are able to push through their fatigue, precisely because they aren’t sick. “Tired” is a nebulous word that covers a broad spectrum of levels of fatigue. A crucial distinction, however, is between regular fatigue and illness-related fatigue.

Regular fatigue

Everyday fatigue that is not illness-related starts … Read the rest

Caregiving for Schizophrenia

October 21, 2020 Adiantku 0

A third of all people will be a caregiver at some point in their lives. Caregiving for people with schizophrenia presents challenges that many people are ill-prepared for.

Host Rachel Star breaks down the principles of caregiving and creative ways to navigate schizophrenia.

Dr. Sarah Kopelovich joins to share schizophrenia caregiver specific training.

About our Guest

Sarah Kopelovich, PhD is a forensically-trained licensed clinical psychologist in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at the University of Washington School of Medicine. Dr. Kopelovich is an Assistant Professor in the department and holds the Professorship in Cognitive Behavioral Therapy for psychosis. Her current research is specifically oriented toward implementation and dissemination strategies for psychotherapeutic and psychosocial interventions for Schizophrenia Spectrum Disorders. She regularly conducts workshops, seminars, and professional consultation across the country for an array of mental health professionals and trainees in CBT for psychosis; Recovery-Oriented Cognitive Therapy; Individual Resiliency Training … Read the rest

Beyond trick-or-treating: Safe Halloween fun during the COVID-19 pandemic

October 21, 2020 Adiantku 0

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we’ve had to find new ways to do almost everything — and the same is true of this year’s Halloween celebrations.

Two mainstays of Halloween, trick-or-treating and Halloween parties, could be very risky this year. Going from house to house, sticking your hands in bowls of candy that many other hands have touched, or being close to people indoors or out, are all activities that could spread the virus. Even if people feel perfectly well, there’s no guarantee that they aren’t sick, and therefore contagious.

That doesn’t mean we have to ditch Halloween entirely. On the contrary, we need some fun — and as much as we can, we need to keep some traditions. We just need to do some tweaking to make Halloween not only fun but safe. The fact that Halloween falls on a Saturday this year is helpful: you can truly … Read the rest

Dear Newly Diagnosed: What We Wish We Knew

October 20, 2020 Adiantku 0


In today’s show, Gabe discusses what he could have done differently as a newly diagnosed bipolar patient that may have made his life a little easier. He and Lisa also discuss some common pitfalls a new patient may run into.

For example, what’s the problem when patients are told they need to be med-compliant at all costs? Should you be open at work about your illness? Join us to hear Gabe’s experiences and learn from his rookie mistakes (which actually ended up working out in the end anyway).

(Transcript Available Below)

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About The Not Crazy podcast Hosts

Gabe Howard is an award-winning writer and speaker who lives with bipolar disorder. He is the author of the popular book, Mental Illness is an Asshole and other Observations, available from Amazon; signed copies are also available directly from Gabe Howard.Read the rest

Coping with the loss of smell and taste

October 20, 2020 Adiantku 0

As I cut a slice of lemon for my tea one morning last March, I found that I could not detect the familiar zing of citrus. Nor, it turned out, could I taste the peach jam on my toast. Overnight, my senses of smell and taste seemed to have disappeared. In the days prior to that I’d had body aches and chills, which I ascribed to a late-winter cold — nothing, I thought, an analgesic and some down time couldn’t take care of. But later that day I saw a newspaper article about the loss of smell and taste in patients with COVID-19, and I realized that I’d likely caught the virus. While I was fortunate enough to eventually recover from it without a trip to the hospital or worse, months after testing negative for COVID, my senses of both smell and taste are still not fully recovered.

In this, … Read the rest